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Jif Peanut Butter Recalled Due to Possible Salmonella

Fourteen illnesses (including two hospitalizations) tied to infection; no deaths have been reported

MONDAY, May 23, 2022 (HealthDay News) — Some lots of Jif brand peanut butter are being recalled as health officials investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella illness tied to the products.

Fourteen illnesses (including two hospitalizations) tied to the Salmonella Senftenberg strain of the bacteria have occurred in Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, Ohio, North Carolina, New York, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, and Washington, according to a statement from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. No one has died from the illness.

“Five out of five people reported consuming peanut butter and four of the five people specifically reported consuming different varieties of Jif brand peanut butter prior to becoming ill,” according to a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigation, the FDA said.

In response, the J.M. Smucker Company is voluntarily recalling certain lots of Jif brand peanut butter products. Those included in the recall have lot code numbers between 1274425 and 2140425 (only if the first seven digits end with 425). All of the recalled lots were manufactured in Lexington, Kentucky. The FDA website has a full list of the lot code numbers under recall.

Consumers, restaurants, and retailers should not eat, serve, or sell any of the recalled products, the FDA said. The product has a two-year shelf life, so consumers should check the labeling of any Jif peanut butter in their home, the agency added.

“Most people infected with Salmonella will begin to develop symptoms 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness, salmonellosis, usually lasts four to seven days and most people recover without treatment,” according to the FDA. “Most people with salmonellosis develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps. More severe cases of salmonellosis may include a high fever, aches, headaches, lethargy, a rash, blood in the urine or stool, and in some cases may become fatal.”

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